Tuesday, April 18, 2017

You'll Think of Me by Robin Lee Hatcher

by
Robin Lee Hatcher
 (Thomas Nelson 2017) 

While I normally have books that I really enjoyed reading, there are times when I am honor-bound to write a review about a book that I only liked a little bit compared to others. This is one of those books. To me, this wasn't my "cup 'o tea" so to speak. 

 This was an easy, laid back read. The setting is set in a slower pace Idahoan small town where everyone knows everyone.

While I really could not connect with the characters and there were a few pet peeves peppered throughout the book, I did find it to be an enjoyable story.

Happy ever after is what one would expect and it doesn't disappoint. The faith thread is strong. The writing is sound.

The one problem to me is the rags-to-riches style of story in this book. I would have preferred that the characters stayed more down to earth. But.... it was a good story that held many positive points and would be sure to delight many readers.
 

***I received this book through BookLook Bloggers in exchange of an honest review***
***click on the title for the option to purchase the book*** 

Monday, April 17, 2017

Mists of Midnight by Sandra Byrd

by
(Howard Books 2015)

I've always enjoyed reading novels by Daphne du Maurier and Georgette Heyer. Sandra Byrd takes the same theme and style from them and then makes it her own.

This is this first book I have read by Sandra Byrd, and it won't be the last. I was intrigued by Rebecca's plight. Englishwomen have a certain attitude and disposition that she must adhere to, and Sandra Byrd pulls this off extremely well.

The mystery is something that is slowly built into a vibrating tension. The red herrings and misdirection adds to the complex plot. The romance within grows slowly, with hesitation.

Since this is the daughter of missionaries, member of the nonconforming church, and faith is a mainstay to her character, the reliance upon God's direction is a steady and natural part of the story.

As for the details in the setting, Byrd uses flashbacks within the book by incorporating them as sudden surges of memories. It's almost like watching a Masterpiece Theater movie where the character's thoughts are pulled back into the past and the viewer sees a portion of their lives before the person they are talking to regains their attention. This writing technique has been sorely lost to literature until now. How nice to see it in a book.

There are many small, intricate threads to this book, foreshadowing, motifs, and clues, that it would take a while to pull each apart and examine them. But why unravel a beautiful book such as this?

The ending is what really has me smiling. If I look back throughout the story, the hints were there, but to see it fulfilled at the end: it is a surprise to say the least.

Overall, this book is exceptional and has become a favorite that I will revisit. A great Gothic novel that rivals many of the past masters.
 

***click on the title for the option to purchase a copy of the book*** 

Saturday, April 15, 2017

The Amish Firefighter by Laura V. Hilton

by
Laura V. Hilton
(Whitaker 2016) 

After reading The Post Card and enjoying David and Rachel's story, I looked forward to reading more about Sam Miller, especially since his scene at the end of the story.

He is a passionate and reckless man. Abigail is a sweet and bewildered woman, one who feels as though she wasn't loved, not even by God. Sam, on the other hand, approaches his relationship with God just as he approaches a fire that must be fought, with head-on abandon.

Throughout the book, I saw Sam mature into a beautiful and devout man; while, Abigail became more self-assured and willing to trust God with her future.

The story kept me reading up to about the end, and then it seemed rushed. I wished for a little bit more at the end to really keep the emotion high, instead of letting it peter off into a mild and sedate feeling.

Overall, I enjoyed this book immensely. I did wish for a little more of the firefighting or at least more of it referenced. The title is befitting of Sam's personality, though. I did wish for more of an interaction between Abigail and her "new family", but all-in-all the book was quite satisfying.

And since I don't read hardly any Amish books, that is saying something if a book can keep me glued to the sentences until the very end.
 

***click on the title for an option to purchase a copy of the book***